Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Inside Animal Minds for its many
examples of animal intelligence beyond the expected.

Inside Animal Minds
Birds, Apes, Dolphins, and a Dog with a
World-class Vocabulary.
By Virginia Morell in National Geographic

Minds of their Own (2008) - 26 pages
Minds of their Own
Animals are smarter than you think.

New Caledonian Crow: Solves problems and creates and uses tools - once thought the domain solely of primates.

Orangutan: Shows cognitive complexity and flexibility rivaling that of chimps; the species maintains cultural traditions in the wild.

Asian Elephant: Retains long memories and social ties; possesses a sense of self.

African Cichlid: Determines social rank through observation, a step on the way to logical reasoning.

African Gray Parrot: Counted; knew colors, shapes, and sizes; had basic grasp of the abstract concept of zero.

Black Leicester Longwool: Sheep recognize individual faces and remember them long term.

Ring-tailed Lemur: Displays abilities that offer insight into the evolutionary precursors of counting and ordering sequences.

Border Collie: Retains an ever growing vocabulary that rivals a toddler's.

Giant Pacific Octopus: Has distinct personality; uses tools, recognizes individuals.

Bonobo: Acquired language spontaneously; makes tools at level of early humans.

Marmoset: Learns from and imitates others.

Western Scrub Jay: Recalls the past, plans for the future.

Bottlenose Dolphin: Excels at communication and imitative behavior.

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Inside Animal Minds
Birds, Apes, Dolphins, and a Dog with a
World-class Vocabulary.
By Virginia Morell in National Geographic

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Inside Animal Minds for its many
examples of animal intelligence beyond the expected.