Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Moose for describing
moose behavior and the raising of their calves.

Moose
Life of a Twig Eater

Moose (2016) - 60 minutes
Moose at Amazon.com

High up in Canada's Rockies, by a crystal-clear lake rimmed with old-growth forest, a moose is born. At the best of times, the odds are stacked against this leggy 35-pounder surviving its first year; normally less than 50% do. But now populations across many parts of North America are in steep decline and scientists believe one of the reasons is that fewer moose calves are surviving their first year, so it has never been more important to understand what happens in the first year of a moose's life. One intrepid cameraman undertakes the challenge of following and filming a mother moose and her newborn calf for a full year in jasper National park, a rugged wilderness that covers over 4,000 square miles, to see how it grows, how it learns from its mother, and how it avoids danger. This stunningly intimate nature documentary takes viewers deep inside the world of moose to experience a mother's love and calf's first year of life in a very up close and personal way.

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Moose
Life of a Twig Eater

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Moose for describing
moose behavior and the raising of their calves.