Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Nature's Perfect Partners for
showing us that animals cooperate across species to
improve their chances of surviving and breeding.

Nature's Perfect Partners

Nature's Perfect Partners (2016) - 60 minutes
Nature's Perfect Partners at Amazon.com

Across the planet, animals are joining forces. They are doing so in surprising and diverse ways, whether it is to hunt, build a home, or solve complex problems. Partnerships were once thought rare in the animal kingdom, but now more and more are being discovered. Some are what we might expect from animals of the same species - elephant matriarchs helping a baby elephant, a pod of killer whales hunting as a team, or a troop of capuchin monkeys scheming together to steal a meal from a snake. What's really astonishing is that often completely unrelated species such as the finch and the tortoise, the lizard and lions, and the raven and the wolverine become unlikely collaborators.

Such teamwork involves considerable brainpower, revealing just what animals are really capable of. By teaming up, animals can achieve incredible things, becoming greater than the sum of their parts.

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Nature's Perfect Partners

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Nature's Perfect Partners for
showing us that animals cooperate across species to
improve their chances of surviving and breeding.