Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Oh, Rats! for giving us the history
of rats and people living together in the same space.

Oh, Rats!
The Story Of Rats And People
By Albert Marrin and C.B. Mordan

Oh, Rats! (2006) - 48 pages
Oh, Rats! at Amazon.com

Rats!
They fought the dogs and killed the cats,
And bit the babies in the cradles,
And ate the cheeses out of the vats,
And licked the soup from the cooks' own ladles.

Revolting - Revealing - Riveting
Brown Rats, Sewer Rats, Alley and House Rats.
Black Rats, Ship Rats, Wharf and Roof Rats.
RATS!

Dirty rats, fancy rats, yummy rats.
Oh,
Rats!

Civilization is dawning. Even then, the wily rat is unstoppable, devouring our food and earning the wrath of hungry men.

So the story of rats and people begins.

Like humans, determined rats conquered the world, prowling the ships of European explorers, riding the caravans of eastern traders, traveling to every corner of the globe, spreading disease as they went. But above all else, rats multiplied. Today, from city alleys to country barns…we are surrounded by the rat.

Able to claw up brick walls, squeeze through small pipes, and gnaw through iron and concrete, the rat is a marvel of nature. Dismissed and reviled as dirty pests or embraced as loyal, beloved pets, rats have also served as delicacies on our dinner plates, been the key to medical breakthroughs, and proven useful tools of war.

Weaving science, history, culture, and folklore, Albert Marrin welcomes you to the fearsome, fascinating world of these astonishing champions of survival - RATS.

Albert Marrin, Professor Emeritus of History at Yeshiva University in New York City, began his teaching career as a social studies teacher in a public junior high school, where he welcomed the challenge of making history come alive for his students. He continues to meet this challenge as a writer. The author of over two dozen award-winning nonfiction books for young people, Albert Marrin received the Washington Children's Book Guide and Washington Post Non-Fiction Award for an "outstanding lifetime contribution [that] has enriched the field of children's literature."

Rats scurried around the neighborhood of Albert's childhood home in Baltimore. He was scared of them, but gradually, as he learned more about rats, the boy lost his fear-mostly. When he saw one recently, the grown-up Dr. Marrin still got the heebie-jeebies. He lives with his wife, Yvette, in Riverdale, New York.

C.B. Mordan is an illustrator of the recent picture book Silent Movie, by Avi, as well as Lost! A Story in String, by Paul Fleischman; Orphan Journey Home, by Liza Ketchum; and F Is for Freedom, by Roni Schotter. Mr. Mordan lives near Kansas City, Missouri.

4-19-19 Homeless Australian man reunited with lost rat pet by police
A homeless man in Sydney, Australia, has been reunited with his pet rat which disappeared earlier this month. Chris, 59, is a well known figure in downtown Sydney where the rat, called Lucy, is usually curled up on a box in front of him. But one day his little companion disappeared as he stepped away to take a toilet break. After a social media appeal, New South Wales police tracked down the missing pet and reunited the pair on Thursday. Chris had assumed Lucy was stolen after she disappeared from the milk crate where he'd left her. Desperate to find her, he put a note up on his box, asking if anyone had seen her. What followed was an outpouring of support, with people posting their own pictures of the pair, hoping that someone had seen Lucy or the person who'd taken her. Police appealed for information, believing Lucy had been stolen, but eventually found the missing rodent. "A woman, who walked past and saw Lucy alone, believed she had been abandoned, so took her home and cared for her," police said in a statement. Lucy was returned to Chris at a local police station on Thursday. When officers asked him to make sure they had got the right animal he replied: "Yes, that's her! She's got the blind eye. She remembers me!" Picking her up from a cardboard box, Chris was visibly relieved, thanking the officers for their efforts. "Sorry for putting you all through the trouble of looking for her. "It feels wonderful. Thank you very much, everybody," he said as his little furry friend scurried around his shoulders. "She knows she's missed me too."

Oh, Rats!
The Story Of Rats And People
By Albert Marrin and C.B. Mordan

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Oh, Rats! for giving us the history
of rats and people living together in the same space.