Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Ravens: Intelligence in Flight
for showing that ravens can plan ahead and are
probably the second most intelligent of birds.

Ravens: Intelligence in Flight
Ingenious and Versatile
Ravens are one of the most intelligent birds

Ravens: Intelligence in Flight (2013) - 55 minutes
Ravens: Intelligence in Flight at Shoppbs.org

Ingenious and Versatile - Ravens are one of the most intelligent birds.

Ravens are members of the crow family, which includes jays and magpies. They are found everywhere in the northern hemisphere and can adapt to live in a multitude of climates - a feat requiring high intelligence. As scavengers, ravens know how and when to take advantage of other animals to help them feed on an animal they couldn't otherwise kill. In Yellowstone National Park, bison that don't survive harsh winters attract coyotes whose sharp teeth and strong jaws rip open the tough, frozen hides, making the meat accessible to watchful ravens. Ravens not only follow wolves, some even fly ahead of the wolves leading them to prey.

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Ravens: Intelligence in Flight
Ingenious and Versatile
Ravens are one of the most intelligent birds

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Ravens: Intelligence in Flight
for showing that ravens can plan ahead and are
probably the second most intelligent of birds.