Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse The Smile of a Dolphin for even
more evidence that animals have rich and full emotional iives.

The Smile of a Dolphin
Remarkable Accounts of Animal Emotions
Edited by Marc Bekoff

The Smile of a Dolphin (2000) - 221 pages
The Smile of a Dolphin at Amazon.com

More than fifty animal behavior scientists recall some of the most touching, funny, and remarkable characters you're likely to ever encounter. Meet a charming, outgoing malamute who rises to the occasion when his mate suddenly becomes ill, and aggravated octopus who repeatedly seeks revenge upon a particular biologist at his aquarium, a devoted mother elephant who patiently nurtures her physically disabled newborn, and a young chimpanzee who dies of grief over the death of his mother. This extraordinary, lavishly illustrated volume explores the borders of animal emotions through personal stories from scientists who have devoted their lives to studying animals.

Longtime mates Turbo and Kachina get agitated whenever the other is even briefly out of sight. Kanzi, jealous of his younger sister, throws temper tantrums when she out performs him. Tulip giggles when she's tickled and loves to play games. And Ake gets angry when scolded; she once hurled a plastic pipe at her teacher when the instructor rebuked her for failing a task.

Turbo and Kachina, Kanzi, Tulip and Ake are respectively, a pair of Arabian horses, a bonobo, a rat, and a dolphin. In each case their devotion, jealousy, playfulness, and anger, their display of emotion, was observed and reported by a scientist - an expert in animal behavior whose formal training has discouraged either anthropomorphic thinking or jumping to conclusions.

In this unforgettable collection of stories, more than fifty experts on animals ranging from great apes to guppies present compelling evidence that, when faced with such circumstances as losing a child, confronting and enemy, choosing a mate, or being tricked, chastised, challenged, played with, or picked on, many animals do seem to have an emotional response, one whose underpinnings may be strikingly similar to our own. What's more, these familiar feeling occur even in such "unlikely" animals as birds, reptiles, and fish.

Harvard paleobiologist Stephen Jay Gould writes in his foreword: "The authors of this book pursue a...lover's quarrel with scientific convention. They write these case studies from their own experiences - the luck of casual and fortuitous moments, but the distillation of a best and most revealing particular from a lifetime of expertise..."

Never before has a book on this controversial subject presented the findings of some many distinguished contributors, another the Roger and Deborah Fouts of Central Washington University, Sue Savage-Rumbaugh of Georgia State University, Cynthia Moss of Amboseli Elephant Research Project, David Macdonald of Oxford University, and best-selling author Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. Combining keen observational skills with a genuine fascination with their subjects, these scientists offer convincing, compassionate evidence for the rich emotional lives of a broad range of species. Engagingly illustrated with 120 photographs, The Smile of a Dolphin: Remarkable Accounts of Animal Emotions will captivate both admirers of scientific inquiry and animal lovers.

Marc Bekoff, professor of organismic biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, is the author or editor of twelve books, including Species of Mind (with Colin Allen), Animal Play (with John Byers), Nature's Life Lessons: Everyday Truths from Nature (with Jim Carrier), and Strolling with Our Kin. A former Guggenheim Fellow and a Fellow of the Animal Behavior Society, Dr. Bekoff is the recipient of the Society's Exemplar Award for major, long-term contributions to the field of animal behavior.

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The Smile of a Dolphin
Remarkable Accounts of Animal Emotions
Edited by Marc Bekoff

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse The Smile of a Dolphin for even
more evidence that animals have rich and full emotional iives.