Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse White as the Waves for telling
us the story of Moby Dick from the whales point of view.
He's fighting for the survival of his species.

White as the Waves
A Novel of Moby Dick
By Alison Baird

White as the Waves (1999) - 277 pages
White as the Waves at Amazon.com

White as the Waves is a modern retelling of Herman Melville's Moby Dick, but with a twist: in this version the story is told using the viewpoint of the whale, rather than that of Captain Ahab. The book follows key events in the whale's life, from his birth off the Galapagos Islands to the loss of his mate in an attack by whalers, to his own desperate assaults of the whaling vessels that are driving his species to extinction.

Alison Baird started writing at an early age, publishing her first poems when she was twelve. She later went on to attend Trinity College at the University of Toronto, where she earned her bachelor's and Master's degrees. She has published short fiction for both the adult and children's markets, and is the author of two young adult novels: The Dragon's Egg (a Silver Birch Award Regional Winner) and The Hidden World. She lives in Oakville, Ontario.

Total Page Views

White as the Waves
A Novel of Moby Dick
By Alison Baird

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse White as the Waves for telling
us the story of Moby Dick from the whales point of view.
He's fighting for the survival of his species.